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Sister Carrie

Dreiser, Theodore

(Book - 1927)
Average Rating: 2 stars out of 5.
Sister Carrie
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Publisher: Cleveland : World Publishing Co., 1927.
Characteristics: 557 p. ;,21 cm.

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Sep 04, 2014
  • Sarah1984 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

18/7 - I enjoyed this, but can't really say why. It was quite slow, certainly slower than my normal reading choices; there were no big events and no climatic ending; and none of the main characters were people I wanted to barrack for, for more than a few pages at a time. Carrie had her sympathetic moments, but there were times when I wanted to sit her down and explain the ways of the world or shake some sense into her. I was happy that Carrie finally managed to 'make it' on her own without the help of a man (what I imagine would have been a minor miracle in those days), and almost wanted to say to her "See, you can do it on your own. Drouet and Hurstwood were just dragging you down and holding you back." It was a blessing in disguise that neither of them actually married her.

If you read my reviews regularly you might have read my views on themes and messages within books - that they're not for me and tend to go straight over my head - I just don't see them, unless they're shoved down my throat (and books that do that are another story altogether). So, I don't really know what Dreiser might have been attempting to say with this book, but I did get a feeling of feminine empowerment from Carrie's ability to survive with or without the two men who came into her life. If that's not what Dreiser was trying to say then obviously I wasn't meant to understand it, but I still managed to find enough to interest me and keep me reading (which was a feat in and of itself as at 557 pages this is now the longest book I've read this year).

I first read this for an assignment for my senior English Lit. class over Christmas break in 1987. I chose the author and book from a class list of required reading. Its plot and imagery have stayed with me since then, and I wish to read it again with my middle-age perspective. It must have been a good book.

May 29, 2013
  • EuSei rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

This is a very badly written book, hard to read, I glossed over some parts, but read it all nevertheless. I wanted to know what all the hype about Dreiser was: hot air! Dreiser was a communist sympathizer. That is clearly reflected in this (boring, too long) book. It is ridiculous to think the "American Dream" is merely that, a dream. Suffice to say that in the US Blacks have attained the wealthiest position of any other country in the world—and many live on Welfare, which is a documented fact. To dismiss America and Capitalism is a means to aggrandize communism, which, nevertheless, does not make it right. NOTICE: Attempts to censor my comments will be fiercely fought under the aegis of American Library Association’s beloved principles: Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Read, Intellectual Freedom. (This has been censored.)

Great American Novel - and a protagonist who is not male.

wonderful descriptions and some very flawed characters. a very good read. the imagery of carrie in her rocking chair is still with me.

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app08 Version gurli Last updated 2014/12/09 10:52